Going from the Red Planet to the Gulf Coast - and How You Could Profit
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Going from the Red Planet to the Gulf Coast – and How You Could Profit

by | published June 22nd, 2019

With all that’s going in the world of geopolitics – and my involvement in it (a discussion for another time) – sometimes it’s nice to come back to relatively simple territory.

So, before I head off to London for meetings with some of my Middle Eastern colleagues, I’d like to return to a topic that recently I’ve been somewhat neglecting.

That, of course, is the topic of my other specialty, oil drilling.

I’ve been to more drilling sites than I can count, and for the last several decades, most of them have relied on the tried and true methods of pulling oil out of the ground to send it off to folks like us to use as fuel.

However, the nature of the energy world is to never stay stagnant for long.

This philosophy is being shown in great detail by the newest innovation in energy, by using the Earth’s natural emissions to our benefit.

Here’s what I mean…

James Bond Has Nothing on This Technology

When one thinks of the newest technology and innovating devices, one of the first things that comes to mind is our national space program, NASA.

For good reason too; what could be more modern and technologically advanced than space travel?

Which is why it’s hardly surprising that NASA had the first crack at this technology for use in its study of Mars.

The unassuming device can rack the seismic pulse of Mars, and allows NASA’s scientists to discover more than ever before about the Red Planet’s internal activity.

It helps them learn how the planet was formed, find subterranean volcanoes, detect earthquakes (perhaps Marsquakes would be a more accurate description), and could even help us discover if there is the potential for life beneath its rusty exterior.

However, there are other uses for this seismic technology to benefit us a little bit closer to home.

Which is why oil drilling companies have been utilizing it for themselves.

See, this technology doesn’t just detect earthquakes, volcanoes, and subterranean life. It can see through even the thickest obstacles.

A bit like a James Bond gadget.

But this goes far beyond the realm of 007.

Detecting the Deepest Deposits – and Profits

I’d call this seismic-detecting technology one of the most impressive I’ve seen in the world of oil drilling.

Because we’ve managed to find most of the surface-level oil we use in our daily lives, but it’s the deeper stuff that’s getting people concerned. The question has been how we will find and drill out this vital fuel.

Well, the answer is here.

Using seismic waves, this device is like having an MRI machine that can see 10 miles deep into the Earth’s crust. And major oil companies estimate that this device could be used to uncover hidden deposits of oil worth trillions of dollars that would be undetectable without it.

This would nearly triple the U.S.’s oil reserves while simultaneously cutting costs by an estimated 80%.

That’s what I call the oil business going seismic.

And there’s a tiny company involved with the development of this seismic technology that’s smack in the middle of this profit potential.

As we speak, this company is manufacturing one of these devices every four seconds just to meet the sudden overwhelming demand.

This is about as straightforward as it’s going to get, and you have a chance to lock in a ground-floor opportunity in a very small company that has patented this critical technology. It has a market cap of just $114 million.

However, I don’t expect it to stay this size for much longer.

So, if you’d like to learn more about this incredible technology – and learn how you can profit from it – just click here.

Sincerely,

Kent

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